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Out of this world: the DB28 Kind of Blue Tourbillon Meteorite

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March 2017


The limited edition release by De Bethune is certainly “kind of blue” – with vibrant azure tones on the case and dial. It will also be kind of expensive, too.

Out of this world: the DB28 Kind of Blue Tourbillon Meteorite

De Bethune has a developed a bit of a habit with unique limited editions that have a distinct look of being out of this world. In some cases, that’s literally true, by incorporating materials from space and pairing them with futuristic dial designs.

Such is the case with the brand’s latest release, the DB28 Kind of Blue Tourbillon Meteorite.

This time around, the craftsmen at De Bethune focused on a meteorite that fell to the earth about five thousand years ago. Made from a mix of iron and nickel, the space rock was recovered from Santiago del Estero, Argentina and brought back to life in watch form back in Switzerland.

Out of this world: the DB28 Kind of Blue Tourbillon Meteorite

Specifically, it was master watchmaker Denis Flageollet who took pieces of the meteorite and, through a secretive process, developed a stunning watch dial displaying various shades of vibrant blue. To add a bit of contrast drops of gold were also carefully placed on the dial to represent a star-studded sky. If the goal was to provide a glimpse of the distant land from where the rock came, he certainly pulled it off to great effect.

The case, although by now a familiar component by De Bethune, is equally stunning in appearance. Coming in at a diameter just shy of 43mm, it is made from blued and hand-polished grade 5 titanium.

Out of this world: the DB28 Kind of Blue Tourbillon Meteorite

For such an impressive case, the movement also should be up to par. So we got the lightweight DB2019v3 calibre, which can be appreciated though the exhibition case back. It provides 5 days of autonomy, with the power reserve cleverly indicated at the back. Of course, there is also the ultra lightweight in-house 30-second tourbillion made of titanium and silicon.

The last edition of a Kind of Blue timepiece by De Bethune cost a quarter of a million dollars. Rest assured that this one, too, will be priced just like the material from which it is made: out of this world.