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A closer look at the Grönefeld Parallax Tourbillon

SIHH 2018

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January 2018


A closer look at the Grönefeld Parallax Tourbillon

Featuring stainless steel dials and a hand engraved rose gold case by master engraver Kees Engelbarts, the new watches are equally durable and beautiful.

When a timepiece - or any other product for that matter - is made to be highly durable, it is not likely to be very beautiful. It’s a question of trade-offs and priorities.

When it comes to the latest novelty by Grönefeld, however, it seems that neither durability nor beauty have been compromised. The timepiece in question is the Grönefeld Parallax with stainless steel dial, which is not part of the actual Parallax collection but is only available on request.

A closer look at the Grönefeld Parallax Tourbillon

As with other watches from the Horological Brothers, they have again used bridges created in the hard and tough stainless steel. The material doesn’t oxidize and looks fantastic when polished, making it a great choice when durability is a priority.

A closer look at the Grönefeld Parallax Tourbillon

With the new Parallax watch, however, even the dial has been made using stainless steel. Different surface finishing, like hammering, bead blasting, polishing and graining, help to provide the nuance to gray face of the watch.

A closer look at the Grönefeld Parallax Tourbillon

The same watch is also available in a rose gold case with a stainless steel dial, which costs €220,000, some €60,000 more than the stainless steel case version.

The fine Art Deco lines on the middle case and bezel are so consistent that it looks like they have been made by machine. To the contrary, they are the result of Dutch master engraver Kees Engelbarts, the artist that carefully carved the lines by hand in the rose gold case.

A closer look at the Grönefeld Parallax Tourbillon

The Parallax also features a tourbillon that has been raised out of the in-house caliber G-03 and above the dial. As with the movement bridges, the tourbillon cage is also crafted in stainless steel.

The movement also boasts a friction-spring-free central seconds, improving power transfer to the regulator and adding to the robust 72-hour power reserve of the movement.

A closer look at the Grönefeld Parallax Tourbillon

In another novelty, the watches also feature a unique crown system. Rather than pulling the crown to set the time, here it is depressed. An indicator on the dial displays the function selected: “W” for winding or “S” for time setting.

Mechanical novelties and exceptional finishing of the stainless steel dials and rose gold case define the new additions by Grönefeld, which could be seen today during the public day at SIHH in Geneva.