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Kudoke shows us its Panda flair

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December 2017


Kudoke shows us its Panda flair

The specialist German watchmaker has released yet another skeletonized work of art, this time channeling the personality of the lovable panda bear.

Kudoke shows us its Panda flair

Germany is known for doing many things well: beer, football, cars, saving the European economy, you name it! Yes, watchmaking can be added to that list too, thanks to several fine watchmakers hailing from Germany.

In each of those examples, performance, efficiency and overall quality are prioritized, all of which have contributed to the highly regarded Made in Germany label.

Kudoke shows us its Panda flair

What is sometimes missing, however, is creativity. I’m aware that is nitpicking, but as excellent German products are, they are not typically the expression of fair and creativity.

Kudoke has something to say about that, at least as far as German watchmaking is concerned. The brand is led by Stefan Kudoke, after whom the brand takes its name. And that name is becoming increasingly recognized for some excellent skeleton watches over the last few years.

Kudoke shows us its Panda flair

The latest in that line is the efficiently named “Panda” watch. Thanks to its predisposition, the panda is thought to embody balance and harmony in life. And Stefan Kudoke is trying to remind is precisely of that with his latest handmade creation.

The watch features a skeletonized panda engraved into a manual winding movement, depicted doing what a panda does best (or what a panda only does): chewing bamboo. A bit more life is brought to the otherwise serene scene thanks to the double electroplating of the movement plates and bridges using white and black rhodium.

Kudoke shows us its Panda flair

Because the 42mm stainless steel watch features skeletonizing and engraving by hand, each one is unique. And as a logic extension of that uniqueness, the watch carries a price tag of 8,500 euros.

In an high paced world, slowing down to appreciate the scenery is often forgotten. Perhaps we should all adopt the more easy going “panda approach” to life. And we can start with appreciating this artistic timekeeper.